News

Thursday, 25 June 2015 08:24

ed turner 180px

Dr Ed Turner awarded prestigious teaching prize

We are delighted to announce that Dr Ed Turner, ICE’s Academic Director for Biological Sciences, has been awarded a prestigious Pilkington Prize for his outstanding teaching.

The 22nd annual Pilkington Prizes, which honour excellence in teaching across the University of Cambridge, were held at Corpus Christi College on 23 June 2015.

Ed was one of 13 inspirational academics to receive an award from Professor Graham Virgo, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education.

The Pilkington Prizes were initiated by Sir Alastair Pilkington, the first Chairman of the Cambridge Foundation, who believed passionately that the quality of teaching was crucial to Cambridge’s success.

About Dr Ed Turner

Dr Ed Turner gained his BA in Natural Sciences from Girton College, before continuing to study for his PhD in the Insect Ecology Group at the Department of Zoology, Cambridge. Since then, he has worked with the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire (BCN) Wildlife Trust, investigating butterfly diversity on chalk grassland reserves and with Imperial College, London running the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project in Sabah – one of the largest ecological experiments in the world.

Ed joined the Institute of Continuing Education (ICE) in January 2012 as Academic Director and ICE Teaching Officer in Biological Sciences. He is also an affiliated researcher in the Insect Ecology Group, University Museum of Zoology, and a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge.

As well as being a charismatic and enthusiastic science communicator, Dr Turner supervises undergraduate and graduate students, gives lectures for the Department of Zoology, and is Director of Studies for Part 1A Evolution and Behaviour at Clare College. Outside the University, he has presented over 70 public lectures since 2006.

As ICE Teaching Officer, Dr Turner has made an enormous difference to ICE’s Biological Sciences teaching and strengthened our links to the School of Biological Sciences, particularly to Zoology, and to the Museums and Collections.

Ed’s teaching includes short courses on topics including evolution, zoological collecting, and the secret lives of insects. He also leads well-received biodiversity tours of Madingley.

Ed has designed and delivered several new University of Cambridge qualifications in the last three years, including a Certificate and Diploma in Evolutionary Biology and an Advanced Diploma in Ecological Monitoring and Conservation. Some of his teaching is fully online and his associated open-access online tasters are very popular.

Dr Turner is full of creative ideas and is a committed and collaborative colleague who contributes fully to the Institute’s work.

View Dr Ed Turner’s full profile

Find out more about Biological Sciences courses at ICE

   

Tuesday, 23 June 2015 10:52

QueensYoungLeaders logo 200px

Queen's Young Leaders visit Madingley Hall for leadership training

The University of Cambridge Institute for Continuing Education (ICE) is delighted and honoured to be welcoming the Queen's Young Leaders Award winners to Madingley Hall today, 23 June 2015.

The Award winners are here to take part in a series of workshops, organised by ICE, to help them develop their management and leadership skills.

They were presented with their Awards by the Queen at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace last night.

This year’s Award winners are aged between 18 and 29 and are working to support others, raise awareness and inspire change on a variety of different issues including education, climate change, gender equality, mental health and disability equality. They have been recognised for taking the lead in transforming the lives of others and make a lasting difference in their communities.

Further information

The Queen’s Young Leaders Programme was established by The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust, in partnership with Comic Relief and The Royal Commonwealth Society in 2014, in honour of Her Majesty The Queen’s 60 years of service to the Commonwealth.

To see a full list of Award winners and Highly Commended runners up, and read more about their stories please visit www.queensyoungleaders.com.

If you or someone you know is doing inspiring work like this year’s Queen’s Young Leaders, you can apply or nominate someone for a 2016 Award at www.queensyoungleaders.com.

   

Tuesday, 09 June 2015 16:25

Heist-Award 25th NOMINATED 200px

Summer Schools nominated for prestigious marketing award

ICE’s International Summer Schools’ 2015 publicity campaign has been nominated for a prestigious Heist Award for Education Marketing.

The campaign was shortlisted in the ‘Best Student Recruitment Campaign’ category, having successfully increased student enrolments during the month of March by 10% in 2015 compared with the previous year.

Director of International Programmes Sarah Ormrod said:

“These short, residential and truly international programmes change the perceptions and lives of hundreds of students each year.  We are continuing a 90-year-old tradition of welcoming people to an open-access learning experience at one of the world's best universities.

“To stay competitive, we need to make that experience – and the publicity for it – the best we can for a very broad, global audience. We have brought together every possible improvement in direct response to student feedback – to text, to curriculum, to clarity of message, and to attractiveness – in order to improve numbers at this stage in the application cycle.”

The results of the awards will be announced at a gala dinner in Manchester on 9 July 2015.

View the nominations in full

View the Summer Schools 2015 programme

About the Heist Awards

The internationally recognised annual Heist Awards for Education Marketing have evolved over more than 20 years to become one of the premier awards programmes for marketing in the further and higher education sectors.

Find out more about the awards

   

Friday, 29 May 2015 11:00

Main 72dpi
 

2015 International Summer Schools

29 May 2015:

Online application: news of extended online application deadlines

The quickest way to apply is by using our secure online booking system and paying by credit or debit card. Online applications can be accepted up until 21 June 2015 for ISS Term I, Ancient and Classical Worlds, Science Term I, Literature Term I. Online applications can be accepted up until 5 July 2015 for ISS Term II, Science Term II, Literature Term II and History. Online applications can be accepted up until 19 July 2015 for ISS Term III, Shakespeare, Medieval Studies and Creative Writing.

Please note: After each of these deadlines, you can still apply for your chosen programme(s) by using a paper-based application form.

The University of Cambridge International Summer Schools will run in Cambridge from 5 July to 15 August 2015. Our programmes give you the opportunity to meet award-winning lecturers, stay and dine in one of the historic Cambridge Colleges and enjoy a range of weekend excursions and social activities.

Our programmes

Specialist Summer Schools are available in:
Ancient and Classical Worlds
Creative Writing
History
Literature
Medieval Studies
Science
Shakespeare

We also offer an Interdisciplinary Summer School where you can select courses from a wide range of topics including international politics, philosophy, archaeology, history of art, history of science, literature, international development and film.

About our programmes

Programmes are delivered at university level and geared towards an adult audience of undergraduate and graduate students, professionals and retired people. All are taught by leading Cambridge scholars and guest subject specialists, dedicated to making their courses both academically rigorous and immensely enjoyable. Programmes combine classroom sessions, subject-specific morning lectures and general-interest evening talks. 

Find out more

Browse our programmes online
Download a copy of our brochure
Request a copy of our brochure or
Call us on +44 (0) 1223 760850

What our students say

“The entire experience was even better than I expected, and I expected a lot. I absolutely loved it and walked away expanded in mind and spirit. I can't thank you enough.” Sally Osbon, USA (Literature)

“I believe that the Science International Summer School was a fulfilling experience. The programmes extended the scope of the subjects I have taken at my home institution and my previous knowledge enabled me to fully understand the presented problems. Also, the international character of the Summer School allowed for the exchange of the different ways of thinking in tackling scientific problems. I think that everyone should attend this Summer School at least once in a lifetime.” Dominika Gnatek, Poland (Science)

“May I thank you for organising that rather wonderful experience, the University of Cambridge Creative Writing Summer School. The stay was an extremely hyperactive two weeks, of very hard work and long hours, of academic challenges, aesthetic indulgences, historical awakenings, and architectural dreams fulfilled. Not only was our two weeks exactly what we wanted, but more. In essence, it was the huge inspiration we require, to continue with our Creative Writing ambitions.” John Redvers Rooney, United Kingdom (Creative Writing)

“My expectation of the summer school was high. Nonetheless, I had not conceived that I would have such a wonderful week, filled with learning, new experiences, inspirational tutors and fascinating colleagues, all of which combined to make my first experience of the summer school one of the most memorable events I could have wished for. I have begun saving for 2015.” David Killip, Isle of Man (Medieval Studies)

For more information visit www.ice.cam.ac.uk/intsummer


 

   

Wednesday, 20 May 2015 13:08

GillianCarr2 180px

Heritage and Memory of War: Responses from small islands

Book co-edited by Dr Gilly Carr and Professor Keir Reeves.
ISBN: 978-1-13-883172-8

Published 2015

Every large nation in the world was directly or indirectly affected by the impact of war during the course of the twentieth century, and while the historical narratives of war of these nations are well known, far less is understood about how small islands coped. These islands – often not nations in their own right but small outposts of other kingdoms, countries, and nations – have been relegated to mere footnotes in history and heritage studies as interesting case studies or unimportant curiosities. Yet for many of these small islands, war had an enduring impact on their history, memory, intangible heritage and future cultural practices, leaving a legacy that demanded some form of local response. This is the first comprehensive volume dedicated to what the memories, legacies and heritage of war in small islands can teach those who live outside them, through closely related historical and contemporary case studies covering 20th and 21st century conflict across the globe.

The volume investigates a number of important questions: Why and how is war memory so enduring in small islands? Do factors such as population size, island size, isolation or geography have any impact? Do close ties of kinship and group identity enable collective memories to shape identity and its resulting war-related heritage? This book contributes to heritage and memory studies and to conflict and historical archaeology by providing a globally wide-ranging comparative assessment of small islands and their experiences of war. Heritage of War in Small Island Territories is of relevance to students, researchers, heritage and tourism professionals, local governments, and NGOs.

Find out more about the book – on the Taylor and Francis Group website.

   

Tuesday, 28 April 2015 12:55

Madingley Hall courtyard gate square 200px

Part-time Certificates and Diplomas: 2015-16 courses now open for applications

Applications are now open for ICE’s one and two-year Undergraduate Certificates and Diplomas starting in October 2015.

These part-time University of Cambridge qualifications are taught at undergraduate level and are designed especially for adult and part-time learners who want to advance their personal and professional development.

All our courses are led by Cambridge academics who are experts in both their subjects and in teaching students of all ages and experiences.


Most of our Undergraduate Certificates and Diplomas are delivered as one-year programmes starting in October. In many subject areas there are two Certificates or Diplomas so if you successfully complete both you can opt to be awarded a Certificate or Diploma of Higher Education in that subject, as appropriate.

Some Certificates and Diplomas are offered as a series of weekly classes; for others the teaching has been consolidated into weekends or day schools, so you can study these courses more easily even if you live further way from Cambridge.

Certificate courses open to all

For most Certificate courses all you need is an interest in the subject; you don’t need any special qualifications to apply. What you will find is that you are surrounded by fellow students who, despite their diversity, share an enthusiasm to learn and to satisfy their intellectual curiosity.

Get support when and where you want it

All of these courses are supported by our virtual learning environment (VLE), which will accelerate your learning and enhance your experience of the course. You will be able to download course materials, contact your tutors and talk to fellow students via the web at a time and place that’s convenient to you.

You will also be provided with a University of Cambridge student card for the period of your study, giving access to University facilities, such as the University Library, other services and concessions. Plus you'll retain access to the learning resources for your course on ICE Online, and to the student common room, for two academic years after you have completed your course.

Fees and funding

Course fees start from £1,800 – just a fraction of the cost of full-tiume undergraduate study. You can choose to pay your fees in instalments to help spread the cost, and you may be eligible for a part-time student loan if you're new to higher education.

Madingley Hall: your place in Cambridge

Most of our Certificate and Diploma teaching takes place at Madingley Hall, a 16th-century manor house three miles to the west of Cambridge with state-of-the-art tuition and study facilities. The Hall is easily accessible by road with ample free parking, and is situated in eight acres of beautiful landscaped gardens.

What our students say

It’s an excellent course which I’ve recommended to friends. It’s particularly good that the standard is undergraduate year 1 – quite a stretch for those of us who haven’t studied for a long time, but very satisfying. (Archaeology student, 2013–14)

“All week my head was buzzing with ideas and questions inspired
by each session and lecture.” (Evolutionary Biology student, 2013–14)

“The classroom atmosphere was fantastic – it was apparent that everyone was enjoying the course hugely, and we had fun, but everyone was also serious about their work. (Creative Writing student, 2013–14)

Read more of what our students have to say about their experience of studying with us.

Find out more

If you have any queries about part-time study at ICE, please contact ug-awards@ice.cam.ac.uk.

   

Thursday, 16 April 2015 08:59

ed turner 180px

'Logging cuts the functional importance of invertebrates in tropical rainforest'

Article by Dr Ed Turner et al., in Nature Communications 6, Article number: 6836.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7836

Published 13 April 2015

Invertebrates are dominant species in primary tropical rainforests, where their abundance and diversity contributes to the functioning and resilience of these globally important ecosystems. However, more than one-third of tropical forests have been logged, with dramatic impacts on rainforest biodiversity that may disrupt key ecosystem processes. We find that the contribution of invertebrates to three ecosystem processes operating at three trophic levels (litter decomposition, seed predation and removal, and invertebrate predation) is reduced by up to one-half following logging. These changes are associated with decreased abundance of key functional groups of termites, ants, beetles and earthworms, and an increase in the abundance of small mammals, amphibians and insectivorous birds in logged relative to primary forest. Our results suggest that ecosystem processes themselves have considerable resilience to logging, but the consistent decline of invertebrate functional importance is indicative of a human-induced shift in how these ecological processes operate in tropical rainforests.

Read the whole article.

   

Wednesday, 15 April 2015 12:51

Madingley Hall butterflies 200px

Report highlights biodiversity of Madingley Hall gardens

Cambridge BioBlitz 2014 was held on 28 June in the grounds of Madingley Hall, home of the Institute of Continuing Education. The results are now in, with the event recording over 380 species of plants and animals!

Read the full report on BioBlitz 2014 (PDF, 202 KB)

Ed Turner, Teaching Officer in Biological Sciences at the Institute of Continuing Education, said: "This amazing number of species demonstrates how much hidden biodiversity can be found in the UK countryside. This is only a snap-shot of the total number of species that are probably in the area around Madingley. I think this result shows how much there is to be excited about wildlife in the UK and I hope the event will encourage more people to learn about local natural history."

Roz Wade, Education and Outreach Officer at the Museum of Zoology, said: "Despite the patchy weather, the event was well-attended by members of the public and experts, with almost 300 people coming to help along to help! This event really shows how much can be achieved in a short space of time when an enthusiastic team of people are involved. The next Cambridge BioBlitz event will be held at the Botanic Garden on the 12 June 2015 and more details will posted soon on the University Museum of Zoology website. We hope to see you there!"

The event was coordinated by the University Museum of Zoology, the Institute of Continuing Education and the University of Cambridge Public Engagement team.

Find out more about BioBlitz 2014

   

Friday, 10 April 2015 12:22

SusanOosthuizen_new_180x180px

'Re-evaluating maps of the Domesday population densities: a case study from the Cambridgeshire fenland'

Paper by Dr Susan Oosthuizen, Medieval Settlement Research 29: 1 – 10.

Published 2014

Proffessor Sir Clifford Darby's county, regional and national maps of a range of data drawn from the Domesday Book revolutionised scholarship on the social and economic history of the late Anglo-Saxon England (e,g,, 1935, 1936a, 1936b, 1971, 1977). While this paper does not seek to challenge Darby's general conclusions, a case study re-examination of the inter-relationship between population density and physical geography in the Cambridgeshire fenland in 1086 suggests the regional usefulness of methodological adjustments to his mapping. It indicates that the population density of the peat and silt fens in the late eleventh century may have been significantly higher than that shown in Darby's original maps, with implications for the contemporary social and economic history of eastern England.

   

Friday, 20 March 2015 14:26

SRA 2star 2015 200px

Madingley Hall achieves Sustainable Restaurant 2 Star Rating

We are delighted to announce that ICE's headquarters, Madingley Hall, has recently been awarded 2 stars from the Sustainable Restaurant Association. This award recognises the ongoing work of our catering team to produce local, seasonal and ethically sourced meals.

To achieve this accolade the Hall underwent a stringent audit, judged across 14 different categories. These included: sourcing local and seasonal produce, fish, ethical meat, dairy and Fairtrade; community engagement; healthy eating; and responsible marketing and environmental initiatives incorporating water saving, supply chain, waste management and energy efficiency.

The Sustainable Restaurants Association (SRA) operates a Sustainability Rating system which helps diners to identify establishments that match their own sustainability criteria. Restaurants are graded One, Two or Three Star ‘sustainability champions’ according to the results of the audit. The SRA is a not-for-profit organisation headed up by leading Chef Raymond Blanc as President. It has over 4,000 members in the UK all united in their commitment to sustainability.

Madingley Hall is home to the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education, as well as being a leading conference venue. It provides in the region of 150 meals per day to students, conference clients and other guests. The Hall offers low carbon meals and uses locally grown organic bread from Cobs Bakery in Cambridge and Havensfield Free Range Eggs from Suffolk.

In addition to the SRA award, Madingley Hall is also the first venue in Cambridge to sign up for the Sustainable Fish Cities pledge. As a result the Hall promises to only service MSC-certified fish at grade 2 or lower. Paul Wright, Catering Manager says:

"Madingley Hall is pleased and proud to have won our 2 star award and to support the Sustainable Fish Cities bid. We hope to champion further sustainability issues across Cambridge in the coming months and years."

 

   

Page 1 of 25