General News

Monday, 11 August 2014 12:11

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'Naked Scientist' Chris Smith joins ICE as Public Understanding of Science Fellow

The University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education (ICE) is delighted to announce that as of 1 September 2014, Dr Chris Smith will be joining ICE’s academic staff as Public Understanding of Science Fellow.

Chris is a consultant virologist based in the University Department of Pathology and in the PHE (Public Health England) diagnostic microbiology laboratory at Addenbrooke’s Hospital. He has made a major contribution to the public understanding of science in recent years through his multi-award-winning Naked Scientists project.

Through weekly BBC radio programmes and other avenues, the Naked Scientists project reaches millions of people internationally. Since 2007 the radio programme, which features University of Cambridge scientists and researchers, has been downloaded around 40 million times worldwide. The ‘Naked Scientists’ also contribute to the Cambridge Science Festival and provide training in public engagement and broadcast skills for University staff and students.

The Naked Scientists project has attracted significant funding and Chris has been the recipient of many national and international awards for science communication, including the Royal Society’s Kohn Medal.

Chris’s Public Understanding of Science Fellowship at ICE is a permanent University role supported by Vice-Chancellor, the School of Biological Sciences, the School of Clinical Medicine and the School of Technology. This reflects the fact that Chris’s work spans medical, biological and physical sciences and into engineering and technology.

Science at ICE

Chris’s work will complement and support ICE’s existing programme of science courses and events for the public, which this year include:

   

Tuesday, 09 July 2013 09:43

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Dr Jenny Bavidge awarded prestigious teaching prize

We are delighted to announce that Dr Jenny Bavidge, ICE’s Academic Director for English Literature, Film and Creative Writing, has been awarded a prestigious Pilkington Prize for her outstanding teaching.

The 20th annual Pilkington Prizes, which honour excellence in teaching across the University of Cambridge, were held at Murray Edwards College on 20 June 2013.

Jenny was one of 13 inspirational academics to receive an award at a ceremony attended by Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz and Lord Watson of Richmond CBE, the University’s High Steward.

The Pilkington Prizes were initiated by Sir Alastair Pilkington, the first Chairman of the Cambridge Foundation, who believed passionately that the quality of teaching was crucial to Cambridge’s success.

About Dr Jenny Bavidge

Jenny took her BA in English Literature and Language at Worcester College, Oxford, and then an MA and her PhD at Royal Holloway, University of London. After her PhD (on representations of urban space in the contemporary novel), she took up a Lectureship in English at the University of Greenwich, where she stayed, becoming Senior Lecturer, until she joined ICE on 1 October 2011. She is a Fellow of Murray Edwards College, Cambridge.

Jenny’s teaching includes 19th and 20th-century American and British literature, close reading and critical theory, and film. She is particularly interested in writing about London and other cities, and is Vice-President of the Literary London Society. Other interests include cultural geography, children’s literature, eco-criticism, and theories of place and space.

In her first 18 months at ICE, Jenny has made an enormous difference to the teaching of literature, film and creative writing. She has academic responsibility for all the Institute’s courses in these areas and teaches and supervises many herself, including:

In particular, Jenny has overseen the development of creative writing as a new specialism for ICE, with a new MSt in Creative Writing and an Undergraduate Certificate in Creative Writing scheduled for 2013/14, and a variety of short courses running throughout the year.

She has also played a key role in developing the MSt in Advanced Subject Teaching, which helps English and History teachers enhance their subject knowledge.

Jenny has given a number of public and academic lectures during her time at ICE, including a talk on ‘queer dreams’ in the work of the Brontës as part of the 2012 Cambridge Festival of Ideas, a Gresham College Lecture on contemporary London crime fiction, and a keynote address at the University of Northampton: ‘The Personal is Political Revisited: Investigating Notions of Place and Space’.

Jenny’s latest publication is: ‘Vital Victims: Senses of Children in the Urban’, Children in Culture Revisited: Further Approaches to Childhood, Ed. Karin Lesnik-Oberstein, (Basingstoke), Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 208-221 and she has recently been writing about New York in children’s fiction. She is currently planning a book on the child and the city.

View Dr Jenny Bavidge’s full profile

Read her latest blog: MOOCs, SOCCs and kisses

   

Thursday, 25 April 2013 13:56

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Dr Susan Oosthuizen publishes new book on Anglo-Saxon England

We are proud to announce the publication of a new book by Dr Susan Oosthuizen, University Senior Lecturer and Academic Director for Historic Environment (landscapes and gardens) at the Institute of Continuing Education (ICE).

Tradition and Transformation in Anglo-Saxon England: Archaeology, Common Rights and Landscape is published as part of Bloomsbury Academic's 'Debates in Archaeology' series.

Most people believe that traditional landscapes did not survive the collapse of Roman Britain, and that medieval open fields and commons originated in Anglo-Saxon innovations unsullied by the past. Dr Oosthuizen tests that belief by contrasting the form and management of early medieval fields and pastures with those of the prehistoric and Roman landscapes they are supposed to have superseded. The comparison reveals unexpected continuities in the layout and management of arable and pasture from the fourth millennium BC to the Norman Conquest.

Dr Oosthuizen's results suggest a new paradigm: the collective organisation of agricultural resources originated many centuries, perhaps millennia, before Germanic migrants reached Britain. In many places, medieval open fields and common rights over pasture preserved long-standing traditions for organising community assets. In central, southern England, a negotiated compromise between early medieval lords eager to introduce new managerial structures and communities as keen to retain their customary traditions of landscape organisation underpinned the emergence of nucleated settlements and distinctive, highly-regulated open fields.

The book is available as hardback, epub ebook and PDF ebook from Bloomsbury Publishing.

Find out more about the book - on the Bloomsbury Publishing website

About the author

Dr Susan Oosthuizen has been involved in lifelong learning since 1985. Her undergraduate degree in Archaeology and History was taken at the University of Southampton; she holds an MA from SOAS (University of London), and a PhD from the University of Cambridge, where her research on Anglo-Saxon landscapes bridged archaeology, history and historical geography.

Dr Oosthuizen teaches Historic Environment courses for ICE, including landscape archaeology and garden history, with a special interest in the Anglo-Saxon and medieval landscapes, and in research skills. She also supervises full-time and part-time postgraduate students in the University.

Profile of Dr Susan Oosthuizen

Historic Environment courses at ICE

   

Monday, 15 April 2013 14:07

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ICE welcomes new divisional directors

We are delighted to announce the appointment of three new divisional directors at the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education (ICE).

Jonathan Baldwin: Director of Teaching and Learning

jonathan baldwin 90pxJonathan Baldwin leads the Teaching and Learning Division, incorporating the ICE Registry and ICE eLearning team.

Jonathan studied for a BA and MA with the Open University while working as a graphic designer and marketer for a FTSE100 company in his native North Yorkshire.

He later moved in to education and has worked at the University of Brighton, the Higher Education Academy, and most recently the University of Dundee where he taught across several design disciplines with a focus on visual and cultural studies, advertising and branding, service and strategic design, and Chinese culture and history.

Jonathan received several awards at Dundee for innovation and excellence in teaching. He is frequently invited to participate in validation events and act as an external examiner. He has been a guest on BBC radio to discuss branding of the 2012 Olympics and the 2014 Commonwealth Games, and in 2007 won a British Book Award for Visual Communication: From Theory to Practice, which is a set text on design courses internationally.

A big believer in understanding the student experience, Jonathan often studies courses himself, most recently in subjects as diverse as statistics, Chinese, and object-oriented programming.

Tamsin James: Director of Resources and Administration

Tamsin James 90pxTamsin James comes to us from Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust, where she was Head of Corporate Governance and Trust Secretary.

Tamsin is a law graduate and a professionally qualified company secretary (specialising in business law, corporate governance and finance). During her time with the NHS she supported the creation of the first Community Services NHS Trust and worked with Cambridge University Health Partners in the development of the Eastern Academic Health Science Network.

Previously, she worked for the University of Cambridge for 10 years; initially in the Registrary’s Office and later as Faculty Administrator and Secretary to the Faculty Board of the Faculty of Classics and then the Faculty of English.

Dr Tim London: Director of Programmes

Tim London 90pxDr Tim London takes on responsibility for the Institute’s Public and Professional Programmes Division. He has worked internationally in a range of educational environments. After completing his undergraduate degree in Psychology (as well as the teacher licensure program to become a primary school teacher), he worked in schools in Las Vegas, Egypt, and Saipan before heading to Washington, DC to work for the American Federation of Teachers.

Following this, he worked with a non-profit foundation that provided educational services to underserved families/children and then took a post as Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. He then served as Director of Education and Teaching Fellow in the School of Education at Queen’s University, Belfast before coming to Cambridge.

Tim has taught at the primary, secondary, and higher education levels, most recently teaching courses/supervising students in the area of leadership at Master’s and Doctoral levels. He has published articles and a book in areas related to leadership and different perspectives on educational systems and has been invited to speak to both education and third-sector groups on these issues.

Tim is passionate about the idea of – and opportunities related to – continuing education, having earned several degrees in different disciplines following his undergraduate degree, including a PGCHET, an MA in Educational Leadership, an LLM in Corporate Governance and Public Policy, and a doctorate in Leadership, Policy, and Organizations.

   

Tuesday, 05 March 2013 13:29

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'Friends of Madingley Hall' launched to mark ICE's 140th anniversary year

Madingley Hall, home of the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education (ICE), means a great deal to many people.

Making friends here, renewing those friendships on return visits, studying with like-minded people, and enjoying the special atmosphere of the Hall and its gardens: this is what makes Madingley Hall magical and memorable.

These are exciting times for ICE and Madingley Hall and in recognition of our 140th anniversary in 2013, we have launched the Friends of Madingley Hall to make it easy for you to strengthen your association with the Hall.

Join the Friends

Membership of the Friends costs just £30 a year. You can join in the following ways:

1. Complete our online application form

2. Email us at friends@ice.cam.ac.uk

3. Collect a leaflet from Madingley Hall or download a PDF version and return the application form to:
‘Friends’ Membership Secretary, Madingley Hall, Madingley, Cambridge, CB23 8AQ, UK.

How your membership helps

ICE’s vision is to share Cambridge – communicating its research and scholarship – with as many people as possible, locally and globally, and throughout life. Madingley Hall, as the home of ICE, provides the perfect environment for celebrating learning and life.

So, whether you love Madingley Hall for our programmes of study, our public lectures and concerts, our parties and events, our bed and breakfast accommodation, our gardens, or for the friends you meet here, your membership of the Friends helps us to achieve our vision.

You may wish to make a donation (Gift Aided or otherwise) along with your membership payment; alternatively, you can easily donate at any time via our Online Giving website.

Enjoy the benefits of membership

As a Friend you will be eligible for the following member benefits:

1. Introductory pack

You will receive a welcome pack including an exclusive Friends of Madingley Hall pin, membership card and wallet, guides to the Hall and Gardens, and the latest issue of the Cambridge Alumni Magazine (CAM).

2. Priority bookings for selected events

You will be invited book ahead of the crowd for selected events at Madingley Hall, such as the Madingley Lectures (our series of public lectures by leading authorities in their fields) and Open Days.

3. Invitations to exclusive Friends’ events

You will be invited to attend exclusive Friends' events at Madingley Hall, such as viewings and drinks receptions.

4.Subscription to our email newsletter

If you provide your email address, then you will automatically receive our regular email newsletter, which will include news of what we’re doing and a link to online termly editions of the CAM. (If you wish to stop receiving it, you can opt out at any time.)

5. Entry into an annual draw to win a complimentary Weekend Course

You will be entered into our annual summer draw to win a complimentary Weekend Course at Madingley Hall.

6. A 10% discount on our Online Courses

You will be eligible for a 10% discount on as many of our Online Courses as you wish to take. To register for an online course at the discounted rate, simply email onlinecourses@ice.cam.ac.uk with your membership number and the title of the course you wish to study. A member of our Admissions team will then contact you to complete the registration.

7. A 10% discount on selected events and non-course-related accommodation

You will be eligible for a 10% discount on non-course-related Madingley Hall accommodation, bookings for private events such as parties and dinners, and on open events such as our seasonal party nights. To activate your discount, please email enquiry@madingleyhall.co.uk or call +44 (0)1223 746222 with your membership number.

8. Complimentary attendance (plus one guest) to our Anniversary Summer Garden Party

You will be invited to help us celebrate the 140th anniversary of the Institute of Continuing Education’s foundation, with a summer afternoon garden party on 21 July 2013.

9. Monthly Sunday afternoon access to the Hall and Gardens

Friends are welcome to call in and enjoy tea, coffee, relaxation and a walk in the Gardens on the following Sunday afternoons in 2013 (simply show your membership card at Reception on arrival):

  • 24 March 2013
  • 7 April 2013
  • 5 May 2013
  • 23 June 2013
  • 14 July 2013
  • 18 August 2013
  • 15 September 2013
  • 6 October 2013
  • 17 November 2013
  • 8 December 2013

10. Access to an exclusive online forum for Friends

Between visits our exclusive online forum will enable you to make new friends, keep in touch with old friends and keep up to date with Friends’ events. If you have provided us with your email address, then you will receive a password so that you can access the Online Forum for Friends.

140 years of continuing education at Cambridge

James Stuart 150pxICE owes its beginnings to James Stuart, Cambridge's first Engineering professor and a great proponent of higher education for women and for the working classes.

He led the establishment, in 1873, of the inter-collegiate lectures at Cambridge, namely the Local Lectures Syndicate – the forerunner of the Board of Extra-Mural Studies and ultimately of ICE. (Coincidentally, 2013 is also the 100th anniversary of James Stuart’s death in 1913 and 170th of his birth in 1843.)

1873 - Professor James Stuart founded the Local Lectures Syndicate, the country's first continuing education department

1923 - First International Summer Schools took place

1924 - Syndicate re-established as Board of Extra-Mural Studies

1948 - University of Cambridge acquired Madingley Hall

1951 - Study bedrooms created from old stable block

1951 - Hall used as residence for adult students on short courses

1975 - Board moved its headquarters to Madingley Hall

1994 - First accredited courses offered

2001 - Board re-established as Institute of Continuing Education

2011 - Lord Rees gave inaugural Madingley Lecture

2013 - ICE launches 'The Friends of Madingley Hall' in its 140th year

Find out more

To find out more about the Friends and how you can get involved, contact us at friends@ice.cam.ac.uk

   

Friday, 31 August 2012 12:40

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Five reasons to study part-time for a Cambridge qualification

If you're thinking of applying for a part-time Certificate, Diploma or Advanced Diploma starting in October 2012, you have until midnight on 10 September to submit your application online. Apply now while places remain!

Here at the Institute of Continuing Education (ICE) you can choose from more than 20 undergraduate-level Certificates, Diplomas and Advanced Diplomas – all taught part-time over one or two years, allowing you to combine study with work and other commitments.

1. Wide range of subjects

Our growing list of subjects include Archaeology, Astronomy, Coaching, English Literature, Genetics, Historic Environment (landscapes and gardens), History of Art, International Development, Local History, Philosophy and Religion.

2. Cambridge expertise and facilities

All our courses are taught by leading experts from the University of Cambridge. As a student, you will have access to a range of facilities, services and concessions, including some of the University's unique libraries.

3. Certificate courses open to all

Certificate courses are open to everyone with an interest in the subject, and you don't need any special qualifications to apply (provided you meet the minimum English language requirement). Diplomas allow you to extend your knowledge, while Advanced Diplomas give you the opportunity to pursue your own research project under the guidance of a Cambridge supervisor.

4. Great value for money

ICE courses are an excellent low-cost alternative to a traditional undergraduate degree, with a typical Certificate course equating to half a year's undergraduate study costing just £1,350.

5. Student loans and bursaries available

If you're new to the Institute, you could be eligible for a bursary award. You'll also be able to pay your fees in instalments, and this year for the first time you may have access to part-time student loans if you're studying for your first university qualification.

   

Friday, 10 August 2012 21:31

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New student loans set to boost part-time study

New government funding for part-time study may lead to a surge of older students returning to the classroom, according to the Director of the Institute of Continuing Education (ICE) at the University of Cambridge.

This year, for the first time, the Government has announced that it will be funding student loans for part-time study towards an award, with no upper age limit for applying.

From September 1, 2012, part-time students studying for higher qualifications than they already hold (and provided they are resident in the UK or EU) will be eligible to apply for a tuition fee loan of up to £6,750, meaning they will not have to pay for any tuition fees up front.

Under the new rules, students will not have to repay their loans until they are earning more than £21,000 a year – meaning that many who are retired or on state pensions, sometimes known as ‘grey students’, may never have to repay their student loans.

ICE’s Dr Rebecca Lingwood said: “We’re delighted that the value of part-time study is being recognised, with the introduction of Tuition Fee Loans. Here at ICE, our part-time Certificate and Diploma courses, which are undergraduate-level University of Cambridge awards, attract a huge range of people, many of whom are studying at university level for the first time and do not have the time or the resources to embark on a full-time degree. ICE offers them an accessible, intimidation-free route into higher education, and gives access to Cambridge’s world-class expertise and facilities.

“ICE courses are also very good value for money compared with traditional undergraduate degrees. A typical Certificate course equating to half a year’s undergraduate study costs around £1,350.”

And with current research at Cambridge and elsewhere suggesting that education – at whatever age – can help keep the brain healthy, there may never have been a better time for students of all ages to apply.

Dr Lorraine Taylor, from Cambridge University’s Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, said: “Extensive amounts of research have shown that, whatever our age, maintaining social, intellectual or physical activities has benefits on quality of life, wellbeing, and health which in turn improve cognition.

“Studying later in life has many benefits; it not only increases our skills but also increases confidence, social interaction and general engagement in life. All of these help to maintain cognitive and physical health throughout our lives and into old age.”

Certificate and Diploma applications for the new academic year at the University’s Institute of Continuing Education opened to the public in June and close on September 10, 2012. Among ICE’s new courses for 2012-13 are an Undergraduate Certificate in Astronomy, Undergraduate Diploma in English Literature, an Undergraduate Diploma in Coaching and an Undergraduate Advanced Diploma in Philosophy. ICE is also expecting to launch an Advanced Diploma in Ecological Monitoring and Conservation from February 2013.

Advanced Diplomas are two-year, part-time research-based courses taught at third-year undergraduate level via a series of one-to-one supervisions. So, they are well-suited to those living farther afield but able to travel to Cambridge occasionally and they provide a solid foundation for postgraduate study.

Added Lingwood: “Higher education can be a truly life-changing experience for many adults. We hope that the new loan scheme will make part-time study accessible to more people than ever before.”

Find out more about ICE's Certificates, Diplomas and Advanced Diplomas

Find out more about funding for part-time study


   

Monday, 02 July 2012 13:14

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Academic promotions at ICE

The Director of Continuing Education, Dr Rebecca Lingwood, has great pleasure in announcing the following Senior Academic Promotions:

Promoted, as of 1 October 2012, to Senior University Lecturer:

   

Saturday, 21 April 2012 15:05

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Madingley Hall opens the door to new facilities

Madingley Hall, home to the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Continuing Education, welcomed Professor John Rallison, the University’s Pro-Vice Chancellor for Education, to cut the ribbon and declare the Courtyard Suite officially open this week.

The Courtyard Suite offers a large teaching and meeting area, with space for up to 70 people in the main room, and 30 in the smaller syndicate room. All areas have full disabled access, state-of-the-art AV facilities including projection and filming capability and free wi-fi. The building was formerly the Coach House to the Hall, and dates back to the mid-18th century.

Dr Rebecca Lingwood, Director of Continuing Education at the Institute, said: “It is exciting to see the transformation into flexible, fully-equipped teaching space. It is a really valuable addition to the facilities at Madingley that I know our students will appreciate hugely.”

Find out more about the facilities at Madingley Hall


   

Friday, 09 March 2012 10:01

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Extramural: Literature and Lifelong Learning – a new book by Adrian Barlow

Adrian Barlow, former Director of Public and Professional Programmes here at ICE, has written a new book about continuing education and his time teaching literature at Madingley Hall.

In Extramural, published this month by Lutterworth Press, Barlow argues for the continued relevance of adult education in the face of funding cuts and the closure of many continuing education departments. His inspiration is ICE’s founder, James Stuart, who had a bold and idealistic vision of broadening education from the (then) elite confines of the Oxbridge colleges to all of society. Specialising in literature, Barlow built his career on this radical principle, taking up the founder’s mantle of acting as a guide and mentor to all those hungry for knowledge and understanding.

Barlow presents the study of literature – as thoughts expressed in language – as key to education. He draws on his own vast knowledge of literature, from Tom Paine and John Ruskin to Alan Bennett and E M Forster, to illustrate the depth that the study of literature can bring to one’s personal and intellectual development.

Extramural is more than a personal account of a career in education, but an argument for an idea, and for the lifelong pursuit of knowledge.

Extramural: Literature and Lifelong Learning – read an extract and order your copy, on the Lutterworth Press website

What the reviewers say

"Extramural is nothing less than a first-hand, definitive celebration of the importance of lifelong learning by a gifted teacher and administrator who wears his own scholarship lightly, delighting, as the best teachers always do, in the fact that 'you are likely to learn as much from your students as they will learn from you.' Nobody who reads Adrian Barlow's wonderfully alert account of [continuing] education courses taught mainly at Cambridge's Madingley Hall could fail to envy those who have participated in them, and no institution could have a better advertisement.

"This, though, is only part of the book's value. Containing the texts of various commissioned lectures on Barlow's twin loves of literature and architecture, plus occasional reviews and a selection of lively, sometimes engagingly forthright items from his blog … Extramural combines polemic, literary criticism and autobiography in what amounts to a vivid memoir of his life in education. As an occasional Madingley Hall tutor myself, I found the book ringing true on every page."

-- John Mole, poet, author and tutor

About the author

Adrian Barlow began teaching for ICE in 1998, becoming Staff Tutor in English in 2005, University Lecturer in English and Director of Public Programmes in 2007 and Director of Public and Professional Programmes in 2009. Recently retired, he is a senior member of Wolfson College, Cambridge and National Chair of the English Association.

While at Madingley, Barlow wrote a regular blog, 'World and Time', in which he discussed a range of subjects including English literature, architecture and the history of Madingley Hall. His blog is quoted extensively in his new book.

Adrian Barlow's blog, 'World and Time'

   

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